God and the Runaway Bunny

The Runaway Bunny, the classic and beloved children’s picture book, was first published in 1942 by Margaret Wise Brown and has the rare privilege of being one of the few children’s books which has never been out of print.  The story is about a young bunny who tells his mother how he wants to run away and how his mother replies she would always go after him.

Once there was a little bunny who wanted to run away. So he said to his mother, “I am running away.”

“If you run away,” said his mother, “I will run after you. For you are my little bunny.”

“If you run after me,” said the little bunny, “I will become a fish in a trout stream and I will swim away from you.”

“If you become a fish in a trout stream,” said his mother, “I will become a fisherman and I will fish for you.”

“If you become a fisherman,” said the little bunny, “I will become a rock on the mountain, high above you.”

“If you become a rock on the mountain high above me,” said his mother, “I will become a mountain climber, and I will climb to where you are.”

“If you become a mountain climber,” said the little bunny, “I will be a crocus in a hidden garden.”

“If you become a crocus in a hidden garden,” said his mother, “I will be a gardener. And I will find you.”

“If you are a gardener and find me,” said the little bunny,  “I will be a bird and fly away from you.”

“If you become a bird and fly away from me,” said his mother,  “I will be a tree that you come home to.”

“If you become a tree,” said the little bunny, “I will become a little sailboat, and I will sail away from you.”

“If you become a sailboat and sail away from me,” said his mother, “I will become the wind and blow you where I want you to go.”

“If you become the wind and blow me,” said the little bunny, “I will join a circus and fly away on a flying trapeze.”

“If you go flying on a flying trapeze,” said his mother, “I will be a tightrope walker, and I will walk across the air to you.”

“If you become a tightrope walker and walk across the air,” said the bunny, “I will become a little boy and run into a house.”

“If you become a little boy and run into a house,” said the mother bunny, “I will become your mother and catch you in my arms and hug you.”

“Shucks,” said the bunny, “I might just as well stay where I am and be your little bunny.”

And so he did.

“Have a carrot,” said the mother bunny.

This simple story, written almost 80 years ago, is a wonderful parallel to illustrate God’s passionate, unconditional love for us. It is a reminder of how He will always seek us, no matter where we go, as recounted in Psalm 139.  He loves us, His daughters, more than the mother bunny could and even more than we human mothers can.

~Contributed by Crystal Linn

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